Tick Alert: Pet Owners Beware

Tick Alert: Pet Owners Beware

With the arrival of summer comes the arrival of an annoying and possibly fatal pest: the tick.

What was once considered a nuisance found only in the wooded countryside has been persistently and increasingly invading cities both large and small. Now ticks can be as close as your neighborhood park or your neighbor’s backyard.

What, precisely, is a tick? A tick is a fairly common, external parasite that embeds itself in the skin of both animals and humans. Once it lands, it inserts its mouthparts into the skin and feeds on the blood. And that single tick has the potential to pass on multiple diseases.

Deer ticks and Western Blacklegged ticks can carry Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever, which animals (and humans) can contract.

 Prevention and early detection are the best ways of protecting your pets against Lyme disease. The intent is to stop it before any symptoms appear. Should the disease progress, symptoms can include stiff, painful and swollen joints, and a limp that comes and goes, often appearing to switch sides. Some dogs have an arched back and a stiff walk. More serious, however, are fever, difficulty breathing and kidney failure. Heart and neurological problems are rarer.

 To help protect your pet, there are several preventatives available – such as K9 Advantix – which stops ticks BEFORE they bite, killing, not only all of the major tick species, but acting as a flea treatment as well. A product meant only for dogs, K9 Advantix must NOT be applied to cats.

 Such preventatives are particularly important for high-risk animals such as hunting dogs, cottage dogs, and dogs hiking through fields. But it’s important to remember that dogs (and cats) can pick up ticks in the city as well.

 When bitten, the skin of some pets may become red and irritated around the site, while others may not even notice the parasite attached to them. It is imperative then, that you inspect your pet thoroughly when returning from areas known for ticks.

 Should you find a tick on your pet, it must be removed very carefully to ensure that the mouthparts are fully removed. If left behind, they can abscess and cause infection. Kill the tick by placing it in a zip-lock bag and pouring rubbing alcohol over it. For the uncertain owner, special tick removal devices are available, while the squeamish can have their vet remove the tick instead.

 Some experts now advise that when your pet is tested annually for heartworm, the same test include screening for Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis (both bacterial infections). A positive test result enables you to start treating your pet early — before the onset of any symptoms.

 Never was the expression “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” more true.

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Article by Nomi Berger

Nomi is the best selling author of seven novels, one work of non-fiction, two volumes of poetry and hundreds of articles. She lives in Toronto, Ontario, Canada with her adopted Maltese, Mini, and now devotes all of her time volunteering her writing skills to animal rescue organizations throughout Canada and the USA.

 

Be Special: Adopt a Dog with special needs

Their bodies may be imperfect, but their spirit remains intact.

So it is said about the special needs dog. Although caring for one can be challenging, more and more people are opening their hearts and their homes and adopting them. For this reason, more and more dogs who might otherwise be euthanized are being given a new “leash” on life.

bigstock-Lonely-Homeless-Dog-And-Helpin-4790849Experts stress the importance of not viewing special needs dogs as “handicapped.” Although they have certain limitations (including partial paralysis, three leggedness, blindness or deafness), they’re not “aware” of them, and can be as active and affectionate as any other dog.

Adopters of special needs dogs insist the rewards outweigh the work. Many use social media to share their experiences, to interact with owners like them, and to encourage others to adopt. They don’t see these dogs’ medical or physical problems as a shortcoming, and don’t believe it makes them any less of a dog.

Those interested in adopting a special needs dog should first fully inform themselves about that dog’s condition, limitations, and maintenance. This includes meeting with their vet, requesting a tutorial on administering medications, and asking if they will make house calls. If not, they should ask to be referred to someone who will.

The quality of life for special needs dogs has been greatly enhanced by the growing number of products available to their owners.bigstock-Icon-Illustration-Representing-25243043-2 There are pet diapers, no-slip boots, orthotic braces, prosthetics, and front, back, combination and amputee harnesses. Ramps, pet steps, pet stairs and pet carts. Adjustable pet wheelchairs that can accommodate dogs weighing up to 180 pounds. And because partially paralyzed pets frequently get carpet burns when out of their chairs, there are washable, heavy-duty “drag bags” to protect their back ends.

Sadly, dogs who are blind or deaf have been characterized as aggressive, unpredictable, untrainable, prone to other health issues, and even a shorter life span. Studies, however, have proven otherwise. They have shown that despite their obvious deficiencies, these dogs are generally quite healthy and capable of living long, otherwise normal lives. And that, whether blind or deaf, they are no more aggressive, unpredictable or untrainable than sighted or hearing dogs.

Blind dogs are trained through the use of both sound and scent cues. By relying on their highly developed sense of smell, their noses let them know where and what things are, and when combined with their owners’ reassuring voice and touch, helps them live as normally and comfortably as possible.

They quickly learn and “map out” their surroundings, and for added protection, have their own “go to” place, created by putting their food and water bowls, doggie bed, kennel, and several favorite toys (squeaky toys or ones with bells inside are best) on a distinctive mat, and never moved. A carpeted runner or large area rug provides them with safe play area because the traction is good and the edges clearly discernible.

Sharp edges on furniture can be padded with bubble-wrap or foam pipe insulation to help prevent injury. Any stairways should be baby-gated, and a textured mat laid before each one to alert the dog to the gates’ proximity. And all outside activities, from pottying to playing, should be done either in a securely fenced yard or securely on leash.

Deaf or hard-of-hearing dogs are trained through the use of sign language or hand signals with treats as reinforcement. Vibrations are also used, such as walking with a “heavy foot” if their attention is elsewhere, and stomping close to their bed or near their head to waken them rather than touching and startling them. Lights can also be used as a teaching tool to get their attention, but, of course, this works best as night.

Since they bond instantly with their owners, placing their trust and safekeeping in their hands, deaf dogs always look to them for guidance and follow where their owner leads. As with blind dogs, all outside activities, from pottying to playing, should be done either in a securely fenced yard or securely on leash.

Because there is nothing inherently “wrong” with them, deaf dogs can do almost anything hearing dogs do. Many of them excel at agility and obedience, and make excellent therapy dogs.

As the owners of special needs dogs readily agree, their own lives have been irrevocably changed. By the sweetness and determination of the animals they adopted. By the smiles they elicit and the kisses they distribute. And most importantly, by the inspiration these dogs provide, not only for them, but for everyone around them.

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Article by Nomi Berger

Nomi is the best selling author of seven novels, one work of non-fiction, two volumes of poetry and hundreds of articles. She lives in Toronto, Ontario, Canada with her adopted Maltese, Mini, and now devotes all of her time volunteering her writing skills to animal rescue organizations throughout Canada and the USA.

Make moving easier for your Cat

Cats, like humans, are creatures of habit. Once comfortable in their surroundings, they are unnerved by change. And trading a familiar home for an unfamiliar one can cause fearfulness and stress. Unless you, the conscientious cat guardian, plan ahead with all the precision of a successful military campaign. Logically, then, moving from one place to another should consist of three stages: preparing for the move; moving day itself; and settling into your new home.

PREPARING FOR THE MOVE

Purchase a large, comfortable carrier and give your cat sufficient time to adjust to being in it. Leave it on the floor with the door open and some treats inside. Keep replacing the treats after your cat has retrieved them.

Set out your cardboard, moving boxes a few days before you actually begin to pack so that your cat can get used to the sight and scent of them.

Maintain your cat’s regular routine for feeding, play and exercise, and quality together time.

If your cat becomes anxious as you start packing, place him/her in a quiet room with some toys and treats and keep the door closed. On the other hand, if your cat is an especially nervous cat, boarding him/her in a professional kennel the day before and after the move may be the best solution — for all of you.

Make certain that your cat’s identification tags carry your new address and phone number. But the best precaution — and the wisest investment you can make — is an updated microchip implant.

wiggett 3MOVING DAY ITSELF

Even before the movers take over the premises, tuck your cat safely away from the center of the storm by closing him/her in a bathroom, together with food, water, a bed and a litter box.

To ensure that your cat doesn’t panic and try to escape if the door is opened, put a sign on the door stating that it must remain shut.

Your cat should always travel with you, secure in the cat carrier, and not in the moving van.

SETTLING INTO YOUR NEW HOME

Put your cat in a room that will remain relatively quiet for awhile. Before opening the carrier, lay out your cat’s food and water dishes, litter box and bed, and place some treats around the room.

Keep your cat in this one “safe” room for a few days, spending time together, soothing and cuddling, and sharing some low-key activities like reading, listening to music or watching TV.

Cat-proof your new home as soon as possible. Included in your “must do” list:

Tuck drapery, blinds and electrical cords out of reach; plug up narrow spaces where a cat might get stuck; ensure all windows and screens are secure; install childproof latches on your cabinets – particularly those containing cleaning supplies; cover unused electrical outlets with special plastic caps, and keep all toilet seats down.

To help acclimatize your cat more quickly, spritz various objects with a pheromone spray or spread your cat’s own scent (gathered from his/her face and neck) with a soft cloth along the walls, doors and furniture.

Begin gradually walking your cat through the rest of the place, one room at a time, constantly praising and reassuring him/her as you make the rounds. Over and over again.

Restore your cat’s former feeding, playing and exercise schedule so that, hopefully, it will seem that nothing has changed much at all.

Cats may be creatures of habit, but they are highly adaptable as well. And so, whether familiar or unfamiliar, old or new, for them, there is still no place like home.

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Article by Nomi Berger

Nomi is the best selling author of seven novels, one work of non-fiction, two volumes of poetry and hundreds of articles. She lives in Toronto, Ontario, Canada with her adopted Maltese, Mini, and now devotes all of her time volunteering her writing skills to animal rescue organizations throughout Canada and the USA.

STARelief now offers Free Humane Rx cards

At STARelief, we are always trying to find out ways of helping families in need of assistance. To continue with our mission, we have tied up with Humane Rx.

Did you know that medication non-adherence kills 125,000 people a year, and adds an extra $290 billion dollars on to our nation’s health care bill? A recent Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey found that in 2012, 50 million adults, ages 19-64, failed to fill a prescription because of financial difficulty, up from 48,000,000 in 2010. Consumer Reports found that almost half (47%) of patients are unwilling to discuss financial difficulties with their doctor; and 68% are uncomfortable discussing them with their pharmacist. In a survey of 2,400 CVS pharmacists, 62% believe that high prescription drug costs are the primary reason why an estimated one third of their customers fail to fill their prescriptions.

bigstock-Animal-doctor-closeup-with-pet-45732859-2The Humane Rx card improves prescription affordability for everyone. All you need to do is print a free Humane Rx Prescription Card and present it to the pharmacist to get up to 75% off. The card offers discounts on Human and Animal medication at Walgreens, CVS, Rite Aid, Walmart and other stores. Consumers can also present the following Humane Rx discount code to their pharmacist to gain immediate access to lower, pre-negotiated discount prices on most prescription drugs: BIN: 600428, PCN: 05100000, GRP: 06400001, UID: STARPR, Pharmacy Help Line: 1-866-921-7286. There is no paperwork, no exclusions, no hassles, just discounted medicines! Prescription discount cards have been around for 15+ years, saving consumers billions of dollars. Most people don’t know about these cards and end up paying more for their prescriptions. The program is funded by a small fee paid by the pharmacy each time a card produces a discount for consumers. Consumers can only save using the cards. We have partnered with Humane Rx to make giving to the less fortunate, easier!

bigstock-Cute-dog-giving-a-kiss-to-the--43915867For every time that the Humane Rx card produces a discount for the card holder, we get $2 from Causes Rx. So as you save on your medication, you are helping save the life of a dear pet! We already have cards that you can collect, or you can just print out a card for yourself from this link – www.humanerx.com/star. For more information on how this works, visit www.humanerx.com/

 

 

 

 

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Post by Madhumita Ganapathy

Madhu, having grown up in a household that always had pets, fell in love with animals at a very young age. She firmly believes that until one has loved, nurtured and cared for a pet, one’s life remains incomplete. She loves writing, travelling, and meeting new people. Madhu lives in Stamford and joined STARelief as Social Media Director to lend her marketing expertise in spreading the word and creating awareness. Connect with her on Twitter @MadhuG86

The Downside of Declawing CATS

Like many cat owners, you may be fed up with finding scratch marks on everything from your floors and furniture to your curtains and comforters, cushions and clothes. And skin. But before you consider resolving the problem by choosing declawing as your only solution, be advised that declawing your cat is NOT a matter of solely removing its claws. Nor is it as simple a procedure as a manicure, or in this case, a pedicure.

In fact, it is a serious SURGICAL procedure that requires a general anesthetic. Commonly referred to as onychectomy, implying that only the claw is removed, the more appropriate term should be phalangectomy, which refers to the excision of the toe bone itself. Why? Because a cat’s claw, unlike a toenail, adheres so closely to the bone that to remove the claws on a single foot is to remove the last bone of all five toes. In other words: amputation. Not only is the operation itself extremely painful, but so is the protracted period of recovery. If “recovery” is even the proper word.

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A cat’s body is uniquely designed, allowing it to move with agility and grace, and its claws are an integral part of that design. Amputating so vital a part of their anatomy drastically alters the conformation of their feet, and since cats walk on their toes, this surgery actually changes the way their bodies work. Because of this, their back and leg muscles may weaken over time, potentially leading to chronic back and joint pain. Other complications from the procedure may include postoperative hemorrhage, nerve damage, and displaced bone chips that prevent proper healing. Post-operative care can be complicated and difficult, both for you and your cat.

Because a declawed cat must wear bandages on its paws until the incisions heal, exercise must be limited for at least one month and cat litter replaced with shredded newspaper to keep litter granules from embedding themselves in the healing tissue. Your vet may prescribe medications to help with the pain, and you must monitor your cat carefully for swollen paws, bleeding and a reluctance to walk, as well as any changes in appetite and behavior. While some cats exhibit no changes in personality after being declawed, others may become anxious, shy, or show an increase in aggression. Feeling defenseless without their claws may cause them to bite if they feel cornered. And the pain associated with the procedure may result in urinating and defecating outside the litter box.

Because scratching is as innate to cats as purring, most experts recommend other alternatives to the trauma and dangers of declawing. Keep your cat’s nails carefully trimmed and direct its scratching behavior to inexpensive cardboard scratchers, scratching posts or emery scratching pads that dull its claws. Use remote aversion devices such as Scat Mats. But if all else fails, the newest and most popular alternative to declawing is the application of vinyl nail caps, available through your veterinarian or pet store. Non-toxic glue binds the caps to the claws, and the caps are replaced when your cat sheds its claw sheaths (usually every four to six weeks).

While declawing remains peculiar to the United States, an ever-increasing number of countries throughout the world consider it both “inhumane” and a “form of mutilation” (except in the most extreme cases or for medical reasons) and have banned the procedure. In fact, a global online campaign declared March 29, 2014 as Declaw Awareness Day.

What are your thoughts on Declawing? Let us know in the comments section of this blog!

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Article by Nomi Berger

Nomi is the best selling author of seven novels, one work of non-fiction, two volumes of poetry and hundreds of articles. She lives in Toronto, Ontario, Canada with her adopted Maltese, Mini, and now devotes all of her time volunteering her writing skills to animal rescue organizations throughout Canada and the USA.

 

STARelief’s featured Volunteer of the week – Sarah

 For us at STARelief, every pet family we help is a small victory. Yet, being a completely volunteer run organization, we are able to only do as much as time and resources allow. And this is where every additional hand that helps is a special one. Today we’d like to introduce a very special volunteer- Sarah! Sarah is a 7th grader at Bi-Cultural Day School in Stamford.  She is  twelve and a half years old and has already raised more than $1000 for STARelief! Other than fundraising for STARelief, Sarah has also been in the Stamford All School Musical three years in a row. We decided to catch up with this young star and ask her what motivates this dog and dolphin lover!
 IMG_2601What inspired you to begin volunteering and fundraising?
I started fundraising because of my upcoming Bat Mitzvah this March.
Why did you choose STARelief?
The thought that pets might not have enough to eat or people might have to give up their pets because they can’t afford to feed them made me realize that my beagle Hunter and I were very fortunate. I love that STARelief helps people and their pets.
Tell us a little about Hunter’s Help
Hunter’s Help is my way of honoring my beagle Hunter who died at fifteen and a half in September. Hunter never wanted for a treat and in fact, may have had too many!  I felt this would be a great way to honor his life.
How did you come up with the idea of a dog wash to fund-raise?
I decided to do several dog washes in memory of Hunter.  Heather from STARelief told me that Pet Valu in Stamford was always willing to help and so I decided to approach them and have dog washes to help raise the money.
What plans do you have in the future to help fund raise?
I would love to continue Hunter’s Help even after my Bat Mitzvah and help STARelief whenever you need me!Sara1
We at STARelief, are thrilled to see such young and enthusiastic supporters for our cause and thank Sarah for all her help! We hope that her example leads many more youngsters to join causes and achieve like she has!
Sarah set her goal at $1000 which, at that time seemed unobtainable.  Its amazing what one person can do! She says she was touched by the generosity of the community, especially shoppers who came into Pet Valu to just buy food, who gave so selflessly and generously when she told them what she was doing.  They enabled her to exceed her goal.  “Hunter’s tail is wagging knowing that he helped people keep their pets happy, healthy and home” she signs off!

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Article by Madhumita Ganapathy

Madhu, having grown up in a household that always had pets, fell in love with animals at a very young age. She firmly believes that until one has loved, nurtured and cared for a pet, one’s life remains incomplete. She loves writing, travelling, and meeting new people. Madhu lives in Stamford and joined STARelief as Social Media Director to lend her marketing expertise in spreading the word and creating awareness. Connect with her on Twitter @MadhuG86

13 years down the line- A tribute to the 9/11 victims

Bravery is a term most often used to describe a human being and his/ her capability to tackle a situation head on. Rarely do we use the term to describe the qualities of our animal counter parts. Yet, if we discount the bravery of our furry friends, we do them a great injustice. 13 years ago a terrible tragedy and injustice struck this nation and had ripple effects in the rest of the world. Yet in the face of adversity we saw heroes emerge from among us. Stories of Roselle and a hundred other dogs resonate to this day. Here is a glimpse of some of those dogs who served, loyally and bravely, who deserve no less praise than our fire-fighters, medical teams and rescue workers: Charlotte Dumas’s tribute, Hero Dogs

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Miraculous tales of survival and bravery, and heartbreaking tales of misery and sorrow emerged. Today, we send out a thought and a prayer to the innocents who lost their lives on the 11 of September 2001. And have also learnt that bravery is not a term we can restrict to the human kind, for the contributions of our four-legged friends in the companionship, search and rescue of victims is no mean feat.

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Article by Madhumita Ganapathy

Madhu, having grown up in a household that always had pets, fell in love with animals at a very young age. She firmly believes that until one has loved, nurtured and cared for a pet, one’s life remains incomplete. She loves writing, travelling, and meeting new people. Madhu lives in Stamford and joined STARelief as Social Media Director to lend her marketing expertise in spreading the word and creating awareness. Connect with her on Twitter @MadhuG86

How does STARelief make a difference?

Often you see STARelief events, fundraisers and more on our Social Media pages. So how do these translate into the success stories that we share? How does our organization identify whom to assist and how do we use the funds we collect? This post is an insight into how STARelief hopes to make a difference in the lives of a pet family in need.

Why we do what we do

We at STARelief, believe that no pet family should have to give up their pet due to financial constraints. Many of our volunteers previously worked at shelters and realized that many families end up surrendering their pets because they could no longer afford to care for their ailing pets. Having to choose between feeding one’s self and caring for one’s pet is a position no one should be in. And it was from this belief that STARelief was born. You can read more about our work here.

How we do it: Fundraising and Pet food pantry

doggy daySTARelief is a completely volunteer run organization. All the funds we get go into helping pet owners who cant afford to care for their pets. We participate and host events which is our main source of funding. Recently we participated in New Canaan Dog days, where we were able to raise aid money. We also partner with others (like Web Thrift Store, Amazon Smile etc.) that offer a service in return for any donations. When you shop at Web Thrift Store or Amazon Smile, a percentage of the price you pay is donated to STARelief. We also host other events such as bake sales, tag sales, the dog wash at PetValu and our upcoming event Doggy Day Palooza. All the funds we raise through these events go directly into aiding pet families in need.

 

We also run a pet food pantry where we accept donations in the form of Pet food. We run numerous donation drives at various locations. We donate the food we have collected to pet families that can’t afford to purchase pet food.

Who benefits?penelope

A few ways we reach out to people who are in need of support are through our online presence (Facebook, Twitter, Website etc.),  partner organizations and through direct referrals. So far we have provided $ 45, 325 in veterinary care. Some of our criteria to provide aid are listed here. We have been successful in aiding over 300 pets in need. Here are some of their stories.

We also recognize the invaluable services of our military veterans. We run the Pet-for-Vets program to aid our veterans.

What can you do to help?

You can get involved in many ways. We are always looking for volunteers who are inclined to make a difference. You or someone you know can join our team by writing in to us. You can also contribute monetarily by donating here. Another way you can engage with us is to donate pet food to our pantry. We love to hear from our supporters, so if you have some great ideas for STARelief, or are passionate about animals, we would love to hear from you!

As always, please help us spread the message of our work and share this post with as many people as you can!

 

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Article by Madhumita Ganapathy

Madhu, having grown up in a household that always had pets, fell in love with animals at a very young age. She firmly believes that until one has loved, nurtured and cared for a pet, one’s life remains incomplete. She loves writing, travelling, and meeting new people. Madhu lives in Stamford and joined STARelief as Social Media Director to lend her marketing expertise in spreading the word and creating awareness. Connect with her on Twitter @MadhuG86

 

 

A hectic July for STARelief

July has begun with a flurry of activities and opportunities for us at STARelief! So here’s a quick peak into our calendar for the month.

We began the month with Web Thrift Store’s Thrift Snap contest.   After this we had the wonderful opportunity of winning a $500 donation from DGP for pets through votes on Facebook. We had our supporters vote for us on the DGP For Pets page and we’d like to take this opportunity to thank them for their support!

Starelief Slider Image Calendar no back

pop up sale july

 

 

The month isn’t over yet though. STARelief has organized a Pop-up tag sale on the 19th of July (yes it’s the coming Saturday!) from 9 am to 2 pm at our pet food pantry on High Ridge road (High Ridge Shopping center, 1137 High Ridge road, Stamford, CT). The proceeds from each sale will go towards assisting pet families in need. So please join us and aid in making a difference to a loved pet and his family!

 

 

 

 

 

We have yet another contest that we are participating in this month. It is the #ThriftyEstateDrive from Web Thrift Store. Donate anything over the value of $50 (original price paid for the item needs to exceed $50) by listing it on our store at www.starelief.webthriftstore.com and help us win 100% of the proceeds from their sale! We are right now at the 7th place, but with your help we can place much higher! So clear out your cupboards and donate those unused earrings, bags, jackets or shoes. Who knows, cleaning your closet may help keep a pet Happy, Healthy and Home!

Help us win and make a difference in the lives of numerous pets and pet owners! For after all, it’s your support that keeps us going!

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Article by Madhumita Ganapathy

Madhu, having grown up in a household that always had pets, fell in love with animals at a very young age. She firmly believes that until one has loved, nurtured and cared for a pet, one’s life remains incomplete. She loves writing, travelling, and meeting new people. Madhu lives in Stamford and joined STARelief as Social Media Director to lend her marketing expertise in spreading the word and creating awareness. Connect with her on Twitter @MadhuG86

Managing your pet’s anxiety this 4th of July

It’s time to bring out the grill and prepare to have family and friends over this 4th of July weekend! Whether you plan to stay home and have guests over or are planning to take a trip over the long weekend, the anxiety over how your pet is going to handle this noisy celebration is sure to dampen spirits. Many pet owners confess that the 4th of July holiday is one of the most stressful times for themselves as well as their pets. Indeed the highest number of missing pets is reported the very next day. The reason for this is that dogs and cats (in fact most animals) are far more sensitive to noise than us humans. They can often hear more than 1.5 times our normal range of sounds! However, this holiday does not need to be as stressful if we are better prepared.

Please keep us safe - STARelief

Here are some tips to help you ease your pet’s anxiety this holiday!

  1. Make sure to let your pets out early in the day: Try to walk your dog or let out your cat earlier in the day. Ideally your pet needs to get his/ her fresh air and exercise before the streets get crowded and the fireworks begin. Even if you normally take him/ her out only in the evening, make an exception and get your pets to exercise early in the day. However, do not deny them their usual outing. This may cause your pet more stress.
  2. Make your home comfortable: before the fireworks begin, make sure to close the curtains and drapes around the house to cut out the excess noise. You can also create some white noise like running the washing machine or the vacuum cleaner. You can also play some soothing music to calm your pet.
  3. Give them company: When pets are anxious and stressed they automatically look to their humans for comfort. Try to stay around them and calm or soothe them with your presence. Ensure that you are not stressed yourself for the animal can sense you anxiety and will think that there is some cause for concern.
  4. Keep special treats handy: Keeping your pets favorite treats handy will help in diverting their attention from any commotion outside. You can also engage them in some activity and hand out these treats as a reward.
  5.  Last and not least- Microchip your pet: Enough stress cannot be laid on the need to microchip your pet at a time when they can easily get lost. Microchipping your pet helps you track them even if they get lost. Animal control officers and Veterinarians often look for Microchips on pets that have strayed or are lost to identify the owner and ensure a safe return. You can learn more about how microchips are inserted and used here.

To help you cope with this holiday, we are holding a FREE Pet Wellness clinic this Sunday (22nd June) at the VCA Davis Animal hospital between 12 pm and 3 pm. Bring your pet for a free Rabies vaccine and microchip. Be prepared and enjoy this long weekend!

advocate_pet wellness

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Article by Madhumita Ganapathy

Madhu, having grown up in a household that always had pets, fell in love with animals at a very young age. She firmly believes that until one has loved, nurtured and cared for a pet, one’s life remains incomplete. She loves writing, travelling, and meeting new people. Madhu lives in Stamford and joined STARelief as Social Media Director to lend her marketing expertise in spreading the word and creating awareness. Connect with her on Twitter @MadhuG86

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STARelief and Pet Assistance
P.O. Box 3035
Stamford, CT 06905
Phone: 203-636-0971
Fax: 203-883-0325
Email Us